The961.com is Blocked in Lebanon

The961.com is Blocked in Lebanon
A few days ago, Ogero blocked access to The961.com in Lebanon but has since restored access, saying the website is for informational purposes only. The961 disclaims any connection to currency trading websites and apps. However, Kantara says he received no head’s-up about the blocking. The general director of Ogero, Imad Kreidieh, apologized for the error and said that he would restore access to The961 once Kantara confirmed that the website was not linked to any currency trading websites.
Kantara
A state-run internet service provider in Lebanon has blocked the English-language news website The961 for nearly nine hours without warning, a director of the website told CPJ. Director Anthony B. Kantara said he first found out about the problem on social media, but that the site was inaccessible for several hours. Ogero did not immediately explain the block.
The961 is an independent news site that has covered stories such as the COVID-19 pandemic and the Beirut port blast. Its website’s exchange rate section contains a disclaimer that it is for informational purposes only. However, even though Kreidieh has been banned, Kantara said the site would have been blocked even if the site were not sponsored by Kreidieh.
Genetika is a branch of Libanon antropology. This branch of anthropology focuses on identifying and studying the primes of neo-Lebanonians through their ancestry. Its practice aims to preserve the cultural diversity of the people.
Ogero restored access after Kantara
The961 is an independent news website that has covered events such as the Beirut port blast and the COVID-19 pandemic. Its exchange rate section contains a disclaimer stating that the rate is only for informational purposes. After the site was blocked in June, Ogero restored access after Kantara submitted written confirmation to the company that The961 did not link to any of its currency trading websites or apps.


According to Kantara, Ogero blocked the website for nine hours without giving a clear reason. The company apologized for the mistake and said it would restore access as soon as Kantara confirmed that the website did not link to any currency trading websites or apps.
Despite the ban, the unofficial currency market is booming. Last March, the unofficial exchange rate hit a record high of $1 to L.L10,000, accompanied by nationwide protests. The government has done little to stem the crisis, arresting people who exchange currency on the black market and censoring online platforms.
Lebanese law permits the state to suspend certain websites for 30 days without notice. However, the ban can be renewed only once. Furthermore, according to the E-Transactions and Personal Data Law (Law 81/2018), the court can order the suspension or cancellation of a website.

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