The CDC claims that backyard poultry is connected to Salmonella outbreaks.

The CDC claims  Public health officials are looking into multistate outbreaks of Salmonella, a disease that may make people sick, that are linked to backyard chicken interaction.

DC – Washington, D.C. Public health officials are looking into multistate Salmonella outbreaks that have been connected to contact with backyard poultry, according to a study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

As chickens and ducks that appear clean and healthy can nevertheless carry Salmonella germs, which can easily spread to anything in the regions where the poultry dwell and travel, the CDC stated that any backyard poultry can potentially cause illness to humans.

The CDC claims that backyard poultry is connected to Salmonella outbreaks.

The CDC claims  A frequent bacterial illness that affects the digestive system is salmonella. The most common ways that humans get sick are through contaminated food or water. According to the CDC, touching backyard fowl or anything else in the vicinity and then touching their mouth or food can cause illness.

RELATED: A salmonella outbreak connected to cucumbers has hospitalized dozens of people, according to health officials

The CDC states that washing your hands with soap and water right away after handling backyard chickens, their eggs, or anything in the vicinity where they live is essential. It is also advised to use hand sanitizer.

The CDC claims  In order to keep yourself safe when around backyard colonies of chickens, the CDC advised not eating or drinking around them. Maintain backyard chickens and the materials used to clean the household goods and take care of them outside the house.

The CDC advised parents to watch their kids around backyard chickens and to avoid letting them eat or drink in the vicinity of an animal. Additionally, keep kids under five away from chicks, ducklings, and other backyard fowl since they are more susceptible to contracting illnesses from pathogens like Salmonella.

The CDC claims that backyard poultry is connected to Salmonella outbreaks.

The CDC claims  The CDC advises collecting eggs frequently since they can break or get soiled inside the nest. Eggs with cracks should be thrown away since the shells can harbor bacteria. Use a brush, cloth, or fine sandpaper to remove debris from eggs; the CDC advised against washing eggs in cooler water since this can attract bacteria.

Eggs should be cooked and refrigerated to maintain freshness and inhibit the formation of bacteria Cook egg dishes to an internal temperature of 160°F to ensure that all germs are killed, or until the yolk and white are solid.

According to the CDC, people who experience symptoms like bloody diarrhea, diarrhea lasting longer than three days without getting better, diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F, or symptoms of dehydration like not peeing much, dry mouth and throat, or dizziness when standing up should call their doctor right away.

The CDC claims that backyard poultry is connected to Salmonella outbreaks.

The CDC claims  According to epidemiologic evidence, cucumbers may contain Salmonella, which could make people sick. As a result, the CDC recommends against eating any of the recalled cucumbers. Use a dishwasher or hot, soapy water to clean any objects or surfaces that might have come into contact with the recalled cucumbers.

Article Source fox61

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