Chronic Insomnia Linked to Ultra-Processed Foods, Study Finds

Chronic Insomnia Linked Ultra-processed foods (UPFs) have been connected to diabetes and heart disease, and a recent study indicates that they may also be a factor in certain people’s persistent insomnia.

Foods that have undergone significant modifications to enhance their flavor, increase their production volume, or extend their shelf life might be classified as UPFs. They stand in stark contrast to foods like fruits and vegetables, which are primarily consumed raw.

Chronic Insomnia Linked to Ultra-Processed Foods, Study Finds

 

Chronic Insomnia Linked Data on 38,570 persons were mapped against sleep factors as part of the Nutrient-Santé study project by researchers headed by a team from Sorbonne Paris Nord University in France.

According to Marie-Pierre St-Onge, a nutritionist and sleep scientist at Columbia University in the US, “it is important to evaluate whether diet could contribute to adverse or good quality sleep at a time when more and more foods are highly processed and sleep disturbances are rampant.”

 

Chronic Insomnia Linked When sociodemographic, lifestyle, diet quality, and mental health characteristics were taken into account, St-Onge and her colleagues discovered a statistically significant correlation between higher UPF consumption and an increased risk of chronic sleeplessness.

In total, 16. 0% of the study participants derived their daily energy from unsaturated polyphenols (UPFs). Additionally, 19.4% of the cohort reported symptoms of chronic insomnia, and those who reported symptoms were more likely to consume more UPFs in their diet.

Chronic Insomnia Linked  Men’s associations were also marginally stronger, according to the findings. The study relied on self-reporting and only evaluated certain times in time, but given the huge sample size, it seems likely that this is a relationship worth further research.Chronic Insomnia Linked to Ultra-Processed Foods, Study Finds

Chronic Insomnia Linked According to epidemiologist Pauline Dequenne of Sorbonne Paris Nord University, “it is important to note that our analyses were cross-sectional and observational in nature, and we did not evaluate longitudinal association.”

“While data do not establish causality, our study is [the] first of its kind and contributes to the existing body of knowledge on UPF.”

Given the prior studies that have been conducted and the recognized connections between food and sleep, it is maybe not surprising that UPFs may be influencing our bodies in relation to the likelihood of chronic insomnia.

This new study appears to provide the flip side of the link that some of the same researchers have previously found: a lower risk of insomnia may be associated with a Mediterranean diet.

Chronic Insomnia Linked to Ultra-Processed Foods, Study Finds

Chronic Insomnia Linked The potential reason for this link is still unknown. Because of their high calorie content, it is simpler to link UPFs to weight gain; nevertheless, further research is required to determine how these foods may be keeping us up at night.

Chronic Insomnia Linked The researchers state in their published work that “in the future, prospective epidemiological as well as clinical and experimental research could advance knowledge about causality and mediation pathways.”

Article Source science alert

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